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U.S. Supreme Court

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CLIP: Supreme Court to Rule on Immigration Executive Orders
Tom Jawetz explained the Supreme Court's decision to rule on President Obama's Executive Orders on immigration. He discussed the history and purpose of the executive action, the current controversy, and the Constitutional questions that will be before the Court.
January 21, 2016 : 10 min. 34 sec.

Supreme Court Landmark Cases: Miranda v. Arizona
Jeff Rosen and Paul Cassel talked about the 1966 U.S. Supreme Court case Miranda v. Arizona, in which the court ruled 5-4 that criminal suspects must be informed of their right against self-incrimination and their right to consult with an attorney before being questioned by police.
December 14, 2015 : 1 hr. 34 min.

Supreme Court Landmark Cases: Mapp v. Ohio
Professors Carolyn Long and Renee Hutchins talked about the 1961 Supreme Court case Mapp v. Ohio, in which the Court applied, via a 5-4 decision, Fourth Amendment protection against “unreasonable searches and seizures” to state criminal cases. The decision also prohibited the introduction of unlawfully obtained material as evidence
November 30, 2015 : 1 hr. 33 min.

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Brown v. Board of Education
Jeffrey Rosen and Tomiko Brown-Nagin talked about the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education, in which the court unanimously ruled that separate public schools were not equal, reversing previous court decisions.
November 23, 2015 : 1 hr. 33 min.

Supreme Court Landmark Case Youngstown Sheet and Tube v. Sawyer
Professors Michael Gerhardt and William Howell talked about the 1952 U.S. Supreme Court case Youngstown Sheet and Tube v. Sawyer, in which the court limited the power of the president to seize property when it ruled 6-3 that President Truman lacked the authority to seize steel plants in order to avert a labor strike in the midst of the Korean War.
November 16, 2015 : 1 hr. 32 min.

Supreme Court Landmark Cases: Korematsu v. United States
Peter Irons and Karen Korematsu talked about the 1944 U.S. Supreme Court case Korematsu V. United States, in which the court ruled 6-3 that Japanese internment camps were necessary for the protection of all citizens during World War II.
November 9, 2015 : 1 hr. 31 min.

Supreme Court Landmark Cases: Schenck v. United States
Beverly Gage and Thomas Goldstein talked about the 1919 Supreme Court case Schenck v. United States, in which the Court unanimously ruled that the Espionage Act of 1917 was constitutional, even when used to punish speech that would be permissible in times of peace, establishing that the First Amendment was not absolute.
November 2, 2015 : 1 hr. 31 min.

Supreme Court Landmark Cases: Lochner v. New York
Randy Barnett and Paul Kens talked about the 1905 U.S. Supreme Court case Lochner v. New York in which the court voted 5-4 to strike down a state law restricting the number of hours that a baker could work. Instead the court held that the liberty to enter into contracts was protected by the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. For more than two decades, the precedents set in this case favored employers in cases involving issues such as child labor laws and minimum wages. The guests al
October 26, 2015 : 1 hr. 33 min.

Supreme Court Landmark Cases: Slaughterhouse Cases
Former U.S. Solicitor General Paul Clement and UMD History Professor Michael Ross talked about the 1873 Supreme Court ruling on the Slaughterhouse Cases, in which the court declined 5-4 to broadly apply the Fourteenth Amendment when New Orleans butchers unions objected to a slaughterhouse monopoly. The court ruled that the “privileges and immunities” clause protected rights guaranteed by U.S. citizenship but not those guaranteed by individual state citizenship.
October 19, 2015 : 1 hr. 33 min.

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Dred Scott v. Sandford
Guests GWU Law Professor Christopher Bracey, and Michigan Law School Director Martha Jones discussed the 1857 Supreme Court case Dred Scott v. Sandford, in which the court sided 7-2 with slavery and declared that Dred Scott and other blacks could not be citizens of the U.S., and that Congress lacked the authority to prohibit slavery in the territories.
October 12, 2015 : 1 hr. 31 min.
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